Cobre approves athletics social media policy

Written by on August 13, 2019

The Cobre Consolidated Schools Board of Education approved an athletics social media policy during their regular meeting Monday — and violating it could mean suspension for athletes and parents alike. 

“The reason behind the social media policy is because we would like for Cobre … to be viewed in a more positive light,” said Athletic Director Nelson Diaz. “As of right now, we feel that activities and athletics is a privilege and not a right. Based on that being a privilege, we feel that our parents, our athletes and the people in our activities should be representing our schools in a positive light.” 

The rules include not posting photos, videos or comments depicting the use of alcohol, drugs or tobacco, and not holding cups, cans and shot glasses. There can also be no online content posted that is unsportsmanlike, or derogatory or demeaning to others. 

“If they put something out there, it can probably haunt them for the rest of their life,” said Sandra Montoya, Cobre High School’s principal. “If it’s the students, we hold the students responsible. If it’s the parents, we hold the parents responsible. If parents are caught bashing the school, bashing athletics, bashing coaches, then they can be suspended from attending games. Same thing with students.” 

“More and more now, these corporations and universities are actually hiring people that go and all they do is look at social media,” Diaz added. 

Board member Gabriel Holguin said there was a “mixed response” at a coaches’ meeting. Diaz said the biggest concern expressed about the policy was how to hold students accountable for parents’ actions.  

“Parents are going to do whatever they want, no matter what the kid says,” Diaz said. “I think the language in there kind of separated that, so I think we fixed that problem.” 

In other news, allowing medical cannabis in school was discussed among the board and superintendent. Two bills went into effect in June which “amended the Public School Code by providing parameters for the possession, storage and administration of medical cannabis to qualified students for use in school settings.” 

“I would like to bring this … for the next board meeting, so that we can have a chance to get our nurses in the loop and talk to our law firm — the Cuddy Law Firm — and see if they can recommend a policy framework to comply with this new law,” said Superintendent Robert Mendoza. 

Board President Ralph “Toy” Sepulveda, who went to a training session on the issue, said storage is going to be a problem. 

“It’s going to have to be a certain person that can administer that,” he said. “The nurses, or whoever administers, is identified. They can refuse to administer without any repercussions — then, the other thing is, then, in that case, parents are going to have to come in to administer. Then, there, it’s up to them to store it, not the school.” 

The board approved the 2019-20 pre-K through sixth-grade handbook, and tabled the use of facilities for the Cobre youth wrestling program. The board also renewed an agreement with the Southwest New Mexico Council of Governments and accepted two donations — one from Robert Padilla worth $300 and another from the New Mexico Lions Crane Reading Foundation worth $24,000. 

“The money that we received [from the Lions] is going to be used for [software] licenses, for Hurley Elementary and Bayard Elementary, primarily,” said Joyce Barela, who works at the central office. “Depending on the need of those schools, if there’s money left for additional licenses, then we’re going to look at being able to give licenses to Central Elementary.” 

—C.P. THOMPSON

(Press Staff Photo by C.P. Thompson)  Ruben Udero and young wrestlers Zeke Sedillos, Alejandro Gonzales, Kyra Aguirre and Kiara Aguirre stand during the Cobre school board meeting Monday. The Cobre Youth Wrestling program has been going on for 43 years.

(Press Staff Photo by C.P. Thompson)
Ruben Udero and young wrestlers Zeke Sedillos, Alejandro Gonzales, Kyra Aguirre and Kiara Aguirre stand during the Cobre school board meeting Monday. The Cobre Youth Wrestling program has been going on for 43 years.

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